Pamela Carmell’s Road to Homing Instincts

Line drawing of side view of a woman with a mohawk, in black, white, and red

Available from Cubanabooks Press

My long history of reading Nancy Morejón’s poetry began in the 70s and 80s. It was an exhilarating time for women’s writing from all over the world, with an outpouring of very ambitious, innovative anthologies of women’s poetry. The editors—mostly women—assembled poems that were dear to them, that they had read and re-read so often. These collections covered a lot of territory–North American women, Latin American women, African women, and so on. Some had a little of everything. One example of these ground-breaking anthologies to which I was a contributor, translating the poetry of another talented Cuban woman Belkis Cuza Malé, is These Are Not Sweet Girls: Poetry by Latin American Women (ed. Marjorie Agosin, published by White Pine Press.) Nearly every one of those anthologies included a few poems by Nancy Morejón. Those poems drew my eye each time I opened those amazing collections and set me on the road that led me to translate the poems in Homing Instincts/ Querencias.

PAMELA CARMELL

Translator of Homing Instincts/Querencias

Photo of translator, a smiling woman with short curly strawberry blond hair in a purple blouse

Pam Carmell in Havana

About cubanabooks

Cubanabooks is a small independent press devoted to bringing first-class literature from Cuban women to a United States audience as well as to a global English and Spanish-speaking public. Publishing select literary gems in English or in bilingual English/Spanish volumes, Cubanabooks aims to correct the current U.S. unavailability of excellent literature from Cubans living in Cuba. At this time we prioritize the dissemination of works by living female writers who reside on the island. The founder and senior editor is Dr. Sara E. Cooper (Ph.D. University of Texas, Austin 1999), Professor of Spanish at California State University, Chico.
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